Every manufacturer claims to have new technology that makes their racquets unique.  So when Head sent us two of their latest racquets (1 MP model and 1 S model) to test out before they hit the market, we were eager to see if the new tech was everything they claimed it to be.  No matter if you’re looking for more power in your serves, more spin in your returns, or overall control in your volleys, we as players crave better playability.  So does Head deliver this better playability with their new racquets?  Let’s dive in.

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Key Features:

  • Graphene Touch
  • Hydrosorb Pro Grip
  • 16/19 String Pattern
  • Balance 320 MM/ 1IN HL
  • Length 685 MM/27 IN
  • 22MM Beam
  • More Control
  • More Power

 

Head Racquet Review Breakdown

Design

graphenetouch-busted-walletmultifilamentBoth the MP and the S models are made with Head’s Graphene Touch material.  We’ve all heard of Graphene by now, so Head decided to add in Kraibon and market it as Graphene Touch.  So what is Kraibon and why does it make this Graphene so special when combined together?  Kraibon is a thin film of uncured rubber that has impressive acoustical damping capabilities.  When mixed with Graphene, one of the strongest materials ever tested (100 times stronger than steel), it creates Graphene Touch – super lightweight, incredibly strong, with impressive control.  This Kraibon is supposed to dampen vibration 7 times better than any other vibration dampening material on the market today.

monofilamentOne of the first things we noticed after our first few hits was the amount of control we had.  After all, vibration has a sound, and the pure sound you hear when you smash the ball across the court is enough to give anyone that boost of confidence they’ve been looking for.  That sound of course is due to the vibration (or lack there of), which gave us less shock and more control.  However, I did notice a bit more control when using the HEAD Velocity Black multifilament string versus the HEAD Hawk Touch Red monofilament.  The HEAD Velocity Black multifilament string had a deeper sound when hitting the ball and a little more forgiveness on those hard to reach returns.

Playability

gripitAh, yes… the moment of truth.  It all comes down to playability.  The frame itself is super lightweight and very well weighted in both the top and bottom, which gave us more power.  Although the MP has a wider beam, it is still .5 oz lighter than the S model.  Both racquets have a beam that is curved on the inside of the head, which is opposite to that of other brands we have tested in the past.  We found this design feature to be a little more forgiving on a bad swing where you would end up hitting the ball towards the edge of the racquets head.  The most noticeable area of my game where I truly felt an improvement were my serves.  Yes, there was plenty of power, but more importantly, there was a great deal of control.  I was able to place it where I wanted (the majority of time), with full and powerful swings.

racquetspecs

serve
I did however noticed a difference between the S and the MP when it came to returns.  When I had the S in my hand, I never heard a bad sound or felt any weird vibration.  When I had the MP model in my hand, there were times (more than I would care for) where it sounded more like a “ping” versus a nice “thump”, which also made for a bad return.  However, this was my opinion and different than our other testers who loved the MP compared to the S.  Depending on your game, you may also like the MP versus the S, but for me, I liked the amount of control and power I had when the S was in my hand.  This of course was also due to the HEAD Velocity Black multifilament string that was strung on the S versus the monofilament on the MP racquet.  Keep in mind you can of course have either racquet strung with either multi or monofilament.  If you are very comfortable with your returns and have plenty of power when it comes to your serves and prefer more durability in your string, then the monofilament will suit you just fine.  However, if you prefer more power, control, and comfort, then I would recommend the multifilament.

Control

headgripGrip-it-and-whip-it!  The Hydrosorb Pro Grip felt amazing in hand with a tremendous amount of control.  There was just enough cushion without losing any griping power.  Although these racquets have a 16/19 string pattern, I was really impressed with the amount of spin that came off my groundstrokes.  When I stepped inside the baseline I felt very comfortable and was able to set good pace while exerting little effort.

Value

Overall, we were truly impressed with both racquets.  Although you can get a solid racquet for under $150, you’ll have to spend a bit more for the latest and greatest.  The MSRP on the MP will be $235 and $225 on the S model.  We don’t have a buy now link available now, however, we will be sure to update this post once these bad boys hit the market.  Until then, you can check out head.com for more information.

 

Head's New MP & S Racquet Review
The MP & S racquets are truly impressive. The price may be a bit high, but the technology that is integrated into these bad boys make it a great investment for your game.
Design9.4
Playability9.6
Power9.7
Control9.8
Value9.4
The Good
  • Power with Control
  • Grip makes you feel like Spiderman
The Not So Good
  • A tad pricey
9.6Overall Score
Reader Rating: (1 Vote)
9.5

About The Author

Digital Editor

Media specialist, fitness junky, and adventure seeker. Geno has a variety of skills that make him a product testing Ninja when it comes to Busted Wallet. Not only is he a black belt in karate, but he kick's ass when it comes to reviewing and putting these products to their limits to make sure they are a great buy for our readers. His career as a Director, Producer, Camera Op, Editor, Animator, VFX artist, and Web Developer have enhanced his keen eye and thirst for quality. There's no better way to showcase his passion for the latest and greatest adventure and high quality tech products than through Busted Wallet.

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